Or Maybe Fat People Aren’t Doing It All Wrong

Talking NonsenseEvery day we are lied to about dieting, weight loss, weight, and health by people who profit from the lies. We are told that anyone who tries hard enough can lose weight and maintain that weight loss.  This despite the fact that there isn’t a single study, anywhere, in which more than a tiny fraction of the subjects were able to do so. Still, anyone who claims to have a method of weight loss that works seems to be able to get airtime, and to get their idea reported in the news as if it’s fact, despite the actual fact that there is simply no evidence to suggest that it will work.

There are obvious issues with this.  The most obvious is that it contributes to a world where governments enthusiastically oppress fat people and try to recruit others to do the same.  It sets fat people up for a life of yo-yo dieting, and putting the lives we want on hold until we get thin, which will never happen, thus ruining our lives and making the weight loss industry money (to the tune of over $60 BILLION a year,) selling a product that they know doesn’t work.

But there are also consequences that are more insidious. With all the weight loss plans out there we are told all kinds of things will lead to weight loss – the gym, “healthy” eating, vegetarian diet, boot camp workouts, vegan diet, crossfit, paleo diet, yoga, pilates, yogilates, intuitive eating, meditation, you name it and I can pretty much guarantee that someone has made diet out of it.

Of course the truth is that fat people participate in all of these things and remain fat, and that there is no reason to believe that any of them will lead to long-term weight loss. (And let me be clear that not everyone who is involved in these things sells them as a diet, but there are people who do.) But such is our trust in the diet industry that instead of using the opportunity to question stereotypes and beliefs about weight loss and body size, people simply claim that fat people must be “doing it wrong.”

If we are fat athletes, we must be doing athletics wrong (because, we’re told, the only “good” outcome of being involved in fitness/movement/athletics is a thin body.)  If we’re fat vegetarians we must be doing that wrong.  If we’re doing a diet but not getting thin we must not be able to properly measure a quarter cup of rice. If we’re meditating but still fat we must be doing meditation wrong.  The belief is that a fat body is evidence that we are doing life wrong. And that’s oppressive, and it’s bullshit. If you did something to get thin and you didn’t get thin (especially if you lost weight and then gained it back) then welcome to the “Almost Everyone Club,” you should know that what happened to you is exactly what we would expect to happen based on all the research that exists.

Fellow fat people, we’re not doing it wrong, we’re just being lied to. There are lots of things that my body is not, but what my body is, is amazing and worthy of respect.

My fat body is not a representation of my failures, sins, or mistakes. My fat body is not an indication of my level of health or fitness, neither of which is anyone else’s business anyway. My fat body is not up for public discussion, debate or judgment. My fat body is not a signal that I need help or input to make decisions about my health or life.  My fat body is the constant companion that helps me do every single thing that I do every second of every day and it deserves respect and admiration.

I will wield my beautiful fat body like a weapon.  I will love it, I will care for it, I will move it, I will show it in public, and I will viciously defend my body against anyone who seeks to classify it as anything but amazing.

The Body Love Obstacle Course

This is something I’m super excited about.  Jeanette DePatie and I (along with some amazing people who we will announce soon!) have been working on a new program called The Body Love Obstacle Course (BLOC.)  It’s about how every aspect of our lives is affected by the way we feel about our bodies, and how we can use that fact to create the careers, relationships, and lives we want, and handle the obstacles that the world puts in our way. As a preview we’ve released a free video that includes some information about the BLOC as well as an exercise to help you get more body love right now! You can check it out here!

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

Deepak Chopra Wants Us To Meditate Our Fat Away

facepalm

Now in addition to shilling for Weight Watchers, Oprah is shilling for Deepak Chopra’s new weight loss gimmick, a 21-day meditation challenge called “Shedding the Weight: Mind, Body and Spirit.”

Chopra told ABC News

Meditation is a way of progressively quieting the mind. We are also introducing the idea of shedding emotional baggage, which frequently is the cause of weight gain.”

Let’s try that last part again:  “…which frequently is the cause of weight gain,” he said with absolutely no evidence to back it up, but he seemed pretty sure of himself so we’ll go with that. Also, there is no reason to believe that even if people are able to shed emotional baggage, their bodies will then become smaller.

“Meditation decreases the levels of cortisol, which is a stress hormone. When you have stress, then you accumulate belly fat.”

This is a gross oversimplification of the research the explores connections between stress, cortisol, and body size and, again, there’s no conclusive research that meditation will lead to long-term weight loss.  And if we’re going to have this conversation then I would like to talk about the health issues that are correlated with raised cortisol (most of the same health issues that are correlated with larger bodies are also correlated with prolonged stress, possibly due to this cortisol connection.) Then we can talk about how the stress of being constantly stigmatized is a health risk, so maybe people who stigmatize fat people and wage “wars on obesity” are the ones who need to meditate on how to knock that shit off.

I’m sure Deepak Chopra has helped a lot of people with a lot of things.  I actually met him once years ago at an event I helped coordinate and he was a low-maintenance joy to work with (especially compared with the local people who weren’t nearly as famous but were twenty times more demanding.) I’m sure he’s well-intentioned.  I doubt that his program will have any greater success than any other weight loss method (which is to say, virtually none.) But on the plus side, at least it’s way less likely to kill you than some other weight loss methods.

But this has got to stop.  There isn’t a single study that exists where more than a tiny fraction of people are able to lose weight long term.  People believe that everyone who tries hard enough can lose weight because we are being constantly lied to by people and companies who profit from those lies. And consequently, people spend their entire lives focusing a tremendous amount of time, energy, and money chasing something that is never, ever going to happen (especially since the more we try the less likely we are to succeed.) Further, this focus on weight loss is often to the detriment of people’s health, and is completely unnecessary, especially given the many options that exist to focus on health and living the lives we want outside of weight loss. Enough already!

I find a mantra helps, so that every time I see someone claim that they know how to help people lose weight I think “Hey, that’s bullshit!”  It helps me keep things in perspective. Feel free to modify to suit you.

The Body Love Obstacle Course

This is something I’m super excited about.  Jeanette DePatie and I (along with some amazing people who we will announce soon!) have been working on a new program called The Body Love Obstacle Course (BLOC.)  It’s about how every aspect of our lives is affected by the way we feel about our bodies, and how we can use that fact to create the careers, relationships, and lives we want, and handle the obstacles that the world puts in our way. As a preview we’ve released a free video that includes some information about the BLOC as well as an exercise to help you get more body love right now! You can check it out here!

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

Craigslist Ad: Free Weight Loss Surgery for Marketing

WTF are you doingFile this under “I didn’t think they could sink any lower.” Marilyn Wann let me know about a San Francisco medical practice that used Craigslist to offer free weight loss surgery in exchange for  “aggressively marketing our hospital and its services.”  See for yourself:

 

craigslist ad

Image used with permission from http://marilynnwann.tumblr.com/image/139142710104

The text says:  We are a hospital looking for an individual in need of, or who has experienced, gastric bypass surgery to lead our social media and marketing efforts to attract patients to our hospital.  We are willing to cover the cost of bariatric surgery for someone who can aggressively market our hospital and its services. If you have already had bariatric surgery and are interested in helping others along their path to weight loss, alternative compensation can be provided. Responsibilities will include managing and promoting social media profiles, posting on blogs and forums, and encouraging potential patients to contact us. Please send a resume, contact details, and a description of why you think you would excel in this position.  Thank you.

Gastric bypass surgery is an elective procedure in which patients are encouraged to risk death and horrible lifelong side effects leading to a dramatically reduced quality of life, for the chance of being thin through medically induced starvation and malnutrition. This surgery has very questionable follow-up since there is a tendency to consider the surgery a success if the patient gets thinner regardless of what else happens – including blaming the patient when things go wrong, with surgeries listed as “surgery successful, patient died.” Harriet Brown wrote a great piece about some of the issues with weight loss surgery for alternet.

I’ve heard of doctors recommending the surgery without being honest about the side effects or chances of death, I’ve heard of nurses telling patients that if they have the surgery there will be men banging down their door (as if they attention of people who only want you if you’re thin is worth crossing the street, let alone risking your life.)  I’ve heard of doctors trying to convince patients that they should risk their lives with this surgery to avoid dealing with social stigma – trying to convince them that the bullies are right and their bodies are the problem.  But I’ve never heard of bribing people with a dangerous surgery. This is a new low for bariatric surgeons, and that’s saying something.

While people are allowed to choose to have this surgery, when doctors start giving away dangerous elective procedures in exchange for “aggressive marketing” of those procedures after the fact, the game changes. What if this person becomes yet another casualty in the “war on obesity?” What if they become one of the people who have constant, horrific side effects, surgery after surgery to try to correct the issues from the first surgery?  What if they become one of the many, many people who regret the surgery and would never recommend it to anyone even tentatively let alone aggressively? Who will pay for their follow up?  What will happen to their contract?  Will they then be forced to pay the hospital back for a procedure they now regret ever having?

Quoting Marilyn “Here’s the response email if you’d like to tell them what you think of their offer of evisceration-for-servitude: 9sw8f-5441341282@gigs.craigslist.org

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

I’m training for an IRONMAN! You can follow my journey at www.IronFat.com

If you are uncomfortable with my offering things for sale on this site, you are invited to check out this post.

 

Healing One Doctor At A Time – Say Something Sunday

Say Something SundayFar too many healthcare practitioners operate out of size bias and everybody knows” beliefs about weight and health that are not backed up the research – diagnosing people as “fat” and prescribing “becoming less fat” and telling their patients that everyone who tries hard enough can manipulate their body size and that it will make us healthier to do so, even though this doesn’t meet the criteria for evidence-based medicine or informed consent. This isn’t just annoying for fat patients, it can kill us.

And doing activism around this can be difficult because of the power imbalance, and because if you upset your healthcare practitioner it can jeopardize your ability to get the care and/or medication that you need.  These differences are exacerbated when multiple oppressions exist including racism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, healthism, ageism, classism, and other marginalizations. It’s also difficult because when called on these issues, healthcare practitioners (like many of us) have a tendency to get defensive and double down so that you get malpractice with a side of victim-blaming.

I want to be very clear that you are never obligated to do activism around this.  However you deal with the issues of access and bias that your healthcare practitioner visits upon you, please remember first and foremost that even though this may become your problem it is not your fault and it should not be happening.  Whatever you decide to do is a legitimate choice whether that’s engaging in activism and asking your healthcare practitioner to provide research to back up the diet intervention she is recommending, or lying and saying you’ll go on a diet that your doctor says you have to agree to before he’ll treat your broken wrist.

But if you’re in a place where you can do activism around this, the good news is that it can be extremely powerful. if we can get a doctor to focus on health instead of weight, if we can get a healthcare practitioner to stop prescribing diets that have no reasonable expectation of success and instead prescribe evidence-based interventions for actual health issues, if we can get a healthcare practitioner to see and challenge their biases about fat people, it changes not just our experience with that doctor, but countless other people’s experiences.  If the healthcare practitioner we help decides to help other healthcare practitioners the affect of our conversation can be exponential. With that in mind, in celebration of another Say Something Sunday, I wanted to share with you a reader’s successful experience working with her doctor.

Today I introduced my doctor to HAES, and she seemed interested. She was actively frightened by the idea that a person might choose not to go to their doctor if it meant fat shaming. I offered her some phrases to use and ideas to give her other patients, that don’t focus on weight but rather on healthy choices to make in order to feel good, have energy, treat their health conditions, and forestall problems.

I let her know that when a thin person mentions weight to a thick person, there’s so much shaming and bullying in our culture that it will almost always create feelings of defensiveness, shame, fear, all the things that keep a fat person from trusting and utilizing their health care professionals. I agreed with her that there are weights that are indicative of problems such as starvation, force feeding, malnutrition, disordered eating or non-eating…but reminded her that correlation is not causation, and she is now looking into HAES and vowing to be extra vigilant about the ways she verbally approaches patients that are thick. She is 100% on board. I will be keeping her.

Woot! I want to emphasize that we never know what approach will work with doctors, so each of us can only do what we can do. That’s why the more of us who are having whatever conversations we’re comfortable with, the better. If you are looking for some resources to use to have these difficult conversations with your doctor, you can find them here.  If you do decide to try activism (and remember that you are under no obligation to do so,) remember that all we can ever do is give someone an opportunity to confront and overcome their biases, we are not responsible for the outcome. In other words, if you try and they fail, that’s not on you.

Whatever you decide, whatever happens, remember that you deserve compassionate, ethical, evidence-based medical care.

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

I’m training for an IRONMAN! You can follow my journey at www.IronFat.com

If you are uncomfortable with my offering things for sale on this site, you are invited to check out this post.

 

Fat Tax and Diet Failure – The Perfect Storm

What a Load of CrapAs I was scrolling through my Facebook feed two articles came across in a row. The first was about how a University health sciences lecturer in Barbados made a public address at the Ministry of Health’s town hall meeting where the topic was the future of health care financing, and suggested that fat people should be subjected to a special tax.

Taxing people based on their perceived “healthcare costs” is a terrible idea.  It’s a terrible idea even if the numbers are on your side (which, when it comes to fat people, they are not.) It’s also the slipperiest of slopes (or it would be if this were about anything other than sizeism.) Are we going to tax sedentary thin people?  How about people who don’t get the recommended servings of vegetables. How about people who participate in sports who will have injuries now, and possibly later in life that are quite expensive? How about people who don’t look both ways before they cross the street? And if that seems ridiculous then maybe it’s time to face the fact that this has nothing to do with health and is actually about a fatphobic society trying to punish fat people?

There’s always some proud fatphobe trying to add to the institutionalized oppression that fat people face, like trying to tax us for existing.  What made this interesting was the next article on my Facebook feed. It was about a study that showed, like every long-term weight loss study shows, that dieting tends to lead to weight gain – that the odds of becoming fat almost double if you diet once and nearly triple if you diet twice.

Studies that look at dieters long-term show that the vast majority of people gain their weight back and a majority gain back more than they lost.  So, even for those who think that being fat is bad, recommending attempts at weight loss is the absolute worst advice they could give.

Something that would be funny if it weren’t headdesk level ridiculous is the study’s conclusion:

Dieting to lose weight can contribute to the risk of future obesity and weight gain. Losing weight requires a commitment to change one’s lifestyle and a sustained effort to maintain a healthy diet and engage in physical activity.

The first sentence is based on their actual research. Their second sentence is absolutely made up – 100% rectal pull.  They have literally NOTHING to back it up, there is no research anywhere of any method of “maintaining a healthy diet and engaging in physical activity” in which people lost weight long term.  The research that does exist comes to the same conclusion that they came to in their research – intentional weight loss simply doesn’t work.

This is the state of diet research, basically these researchers’ concluded:  Dieting leads to weight gain.  In order to lose weight you have to engage in a game of semantics in which you call dieting something else.”  This is sadly typical of the embarrassing state of research when it comes to weight loss and health, as Linda Bacon and Lucy Aphramor have explained.

So, let’s take stock of the situation here: There is not a single study of any intentional weight loss method where more than a tiny fraction of people are able to lose weight long-term.  And even among the tiny fraction who maintain weight loss, most don’t lose enough weight to change classes – so those who started classes as “obese” were still “obese” after the weight loss, and those classed as “overweight” were still “overweight” after the weight loss. And remember that the majority of people actually gain weight long term.

So if the fat tax people get their way, they will tax people for their weight in pounds times 703 divided by their height in inches squared (aka – their BMI.)  We know from the research that any attempt that fat people make to try to be not fat (so that they don’t have to pay the fat tax) will likely end up in them being fatter (and perhaps subject to even more tax?)   Think it seems far-fetched? It’s already happening in corporate wellness programs in which people are penalized for being fat and have to pay thousands more for their insurance premiums until they lose weight, including having their companies enroll them in diet programs with proven track records of creating weight gain.

This is a vicious cycle of oppression and it has to stop.  This is why our public health conversation should focusing on providing access to information, and options for health, and removing barriers to health (like lack of access, oppression and marginalization, doctor bias etc.) Public health should be about making information and options available to the public, not about making fat people’s bodies the public’s business. And if we need the revenue that badly, maybe we can create a bigot tax so that making other people’s lives miserable becomes a little more expensive.

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

I’m training for an IRONMAN! You can follow my journey at www.IronFat.com

If you are uncomfortable with my offering things for sale on this site, you are invited to check out this post.

 

 

 

Some Dreams Might Be Better Stolen

Success and DietsToday I was accused, not for the first time, of “stealing people’s dreams.” This happens to those of us who are very vocal about the mountain of research that shows that long term weight loss is nearly impossible.

People criticize me for this despite the fact that I am very clear that people have every right to choose dieting just like I have every right to choose a Health at Every Size practice, and that I only talk about these things in my forum – I would never go to someone else’s weight loss blog and tell them that they should practice HAES. But since we are constantly and purposefully misled about the facts when it comes to weight loss and health, I think it’s important to tell the truth about it.

The people who sew in the tag that says “Cape does not enable user to fly” are not stealing my dreams of flying.  They are giving me the opportunity to read the tag and get information so that I can make an informed decision before I yell “Hey y’all watch this!”, jump off a roof and break something I’ll need in later life.

But back to weight loss, what is the dream really?  Is it being smaller than someone is now, or is it all the things that they believe will come along with that?  Consider these sentences:

I lost weight, I started going to more parties and now I have more friends.

I lost weight, I became more confident and then I met my spouse.

I lost weight, and then I starting going out dancing.

You could remove “I lost weight” from each of these sentences and they could still be complete. That doesn’t mean that fat people aren’t oppressed by a world that is sizeist, and it doesn’t mean that we don’t have to deal with bullshit shame, stigma, bullying, and harassment that isn’t our fault but becomes our problem.  But the reality for almost all dieters is that if they keep the “I lost weight” in those sentences, then they will will need to add a sentence at the end that starts “Now that I’ve gained the weight back…” That makes me think that we might want to come up with some different dreams. I offer the following:

A world where we accept and celebrate the diversity of body sizes.

A world where health care professionals base their advice on scientific evidence.

A world where we pour sixty billion dollars a year into creating access to healthcare and options for food and options, instead of failed weight loss programs, and where the US is a successful role model for everyone having access to health,  rather than a failed role model for making everyone thin.

If someone’s dream is weight loss, then the research shows that they have almost no chance of achieving it, and have a huge chance of ending up less healthy than they started.  That doesn’t mean they aren’t allowed to try, but given those odds I think it’s critical that people understand that there are other options.

A dieter once commented on a piece that I wrote saying “I know that I only have a 5% chance of succeeding, but I’m just hoping and praying to be in that 5% because, really, what else makes sense?” People are allowed to choose “hoping to be an statistical anomaly” as a strategy for health and happiness. But it’s not the only thing that makes sense, at least not to me. To me remembering that I have the right to pursue life, liberty, and happiness in the fat body I have makes sense.  Remembering that health is not an obligation, a barometer of worthiness, or entirely within my control makes sense. Having gratitude for my amazing body makes sense. Choosing a path to health based on research makes sense.  Choosing a path to health that has a chance of succeeding outside the margin of error makes sense to me.

I’m not interested in stealing other people’s dreams, but I’m also not going to let a fatphobic world that tells me lies about weight loss and health steal mine.

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

I’m training for an IRONMAN! You can follow my journey at www.IronFat.com

If you are uncomfortable with my offering things for sale on this site, you are invited to check out this post.

Transformation Tuesday

Before AfterIn several Facebook groups that I belong to, most of which are fitness/athletics related, they have “Transformation Tuesday.”  This is code for “Weight Loss Tuesday” as people post before and afters of their weight loss “successes” and other people tell them how much prettier/younger/better they look now than they looked before.

People are allowed to do this, the groups allow it and I was clear that weight loss talk was allowed when I joined. Still, I wanted to provide a different perspective for Transformation Tuesday.

First of all, almost everyone who posts for TT is in the “honeymoon” period before the weight regain starts. The truth is that almost every single one of them will gain the weight back, many will gain back more. I wonder what the effect of all those Transformation Tuesday compliments will be when they are looking at them from the other side.  I worry about the ways that these TT “compliments” reinforce sizeism, ageism, healthism, and ableism.

So as an alternative, I offer my Transformation Tuesday Story:

There was a time when I believed that I had to be thin to be healthy and happy. There was a time when I believed that smaller bodies were more beautiful, and that manipulating my body size was praiseworthy.  There was a time when I saw my body as “before” (even though it was actually “current”) and the elusive “after” which actually ended up being a transitional phase during which I was briefly thinner between periods of being fat.

My life transformed when I realized that there’s no such thing as “before” and “after,” pictures, just “during” pictures.  My life transformed when I realized that being thin probably isn’t possible for me and, even if it was, it was not a goal worthy of my time, energy, or money.  My relationships with my body, food, and movement transformed when I realized that health isn’t an obligation, barometer of worthiness, or guaranteed under any circumstances, and that my best chance of supporting my health was healthy habits and not body size manipulation. Those relationships transformed again when I started appreciating all the things my body does for me rather than being mad that it didn’t look like a photoshopped picture of someone else. Those relationships transformed again when I realized that my beauty isn’t diminished because some people can’t see it. Those relationships keep getting better because they are now based on truth, and respect, and joy instead of on diet industry lies, self-loathing and desperation. By leaving behind a diet mentality and sizeist beliefs, I transformed my life not just on Tuesday, but every day.

Do you have a Transformation Tuesday story that doesn’t revolve around body size manipulation? Feel free to leave it in the comments!

Like this blog?  Here’s more cool stuff:

Like my work?  Want to help me keep doing it? Become a Member! For ten bucks a month you can support size diversity activism, help keep the blog ad free, and get deals from size positive businesses as a thank you.  Click here for details

Book and Dance Class Sale!  I’m on a journey to complete an IRONMAN triathlon, and I’m having a sale on all my books, DVDs, and digital downloads to help pay for it. You get books and dance classes, I get spandex clothes and bike parts. Everybody wins! If you want, you can check it out here!

Book Me!  I’d love to speak to your organization. You can get more information here or just e-mail me at ragen at danceswithfat dot org!

I’m training for an IRONMAN! You can follow my journey at www.IronFat.com

If you are uncomfortable with my offering things for sale on this site, you are invited to check out this post.